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Date of registration: Jun 15th 2014

Language Team: Taiwan, troditional chinese

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Location: Taiwan, East Asia

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Saturday, July 21st 2018, 3:58pm

Quotational Error in TZM Defined

I'm not quite sure if I should report this since this isn't about translation but about fact with respect to content to be translated.

I discovered that in TZM Defined, Essay 4, Logic vs. Psychology, the quote of Aristotle: "We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly" might be a misattribution because of the way it is mentioned in Wikiquote, page of Aristotle, as part of the "Misattributed" context.

The context is specifically referring to another quote: "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit" as misattributed and that "the misattribution is from taking Durant's summation of Aristotle's ideas as being the words of Aristotle himself".

Yet, I think that the quote from TZM Defined is also a misattribution since the quote itself in TZM Defined is not a quote itself in the source book. That makes it much more possible that the quote is actually a quote from the book author than from Aristotle himself.

In the page of Excellence in Wikiquote, it also shows the whole quote of excellence from Durant in his book.

Portal to Misattribution: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Aristotle#Misattributed
Portal to Excellence: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Excellence
Signature from »kton36369« 民主國家的生活水平,仰賴它人民監督政府的效率還有理性參與公共討論的能力,所以我們應該盡力提升我們討論公共事務時的討論品質。
The standard of living in a democratic country depends on its people's ability to monitor the efficiency of the government and the ability to participate in public discussions rationally, so we should try our best to improve the quality of our discussions when discussing public affairs.(Translation by Google)

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